DQSIS

Points of interest
velotone:

So good. Tattoo idea.

velotone:

So good. Tattoo idea.

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justmigrate:

Hi,

I just moved my posts from Posterous! Do go though my blog for all the new posts.

Its easy to migrate try JustMigrate

3Crumbs app - Are you the local thrifter we all have been looking for? 

A couple of days ago I accidentally watched on TV episode 3 season 1 of the series ‘An idiot abroad’. I found it hysterically funny, very clever, and highly entertaining. 

I was so intrigued by the concept and mostly by Karl Pilkington that now, only two days later, I have watched every episode of both seasons.

Image source

The places that Karl visits and the tortures that Ricky and Stephen put him through are the main point of the series.

However, what I personally realized by watching Karl’s adventures is that traveling is not just about the places. It’s also about the people. 

In particular, two episodes stack out for me that heavily support the above:

Karl’s trip to India

and Karl’s trip to Japan

During Karl’s stay with these two particular and good-natured people, he seems -to me- as the happiest than in any other occassion or in any other part of the world that he visits during his travels. 

Finally, Karl’s reflection on tea is definitely my favorite part of the series, and the part that made me think the most. 

A couple of days ago I accidentally watched on TV episode 3 season 1 of the series ‘An idiot abroad’. I found it hysterically funny, very clever, and highly entertaining. 

I was so intrigued by the concept and mostly by Karl Pilkington that now, only two days later, I have watched every episode of both seasons.

Image source

The places that Karl visits and the tortures that Ricky and Stephen put him through are the main point of the series.

However, what I personally realized by watching Karl’s adventures is that traveling is not just about the places. It’s also about the people. 

In particular, two episodes stack out for me that heavily support the above:

Karl’s trip to India

and Karl’s trip to Japan

During Karl’s stay with these two particular and good-natured people, he seems -to me- as the happiest than in any other occassion or in any other part of the world that he visits during his travels. 

Finally, Karl’s reflection on tea is definitely my favorite part of the series, and the part that made me think the most. 

Back in 2007, while still living in Austria, I purchased my first road bike, composing of a no-name aluminum frame and a Shimano 105 groupset

Between 2007 and 2010, that bike lived ‘glorious’ days with me finishing 992nd in St. Pölten IRONMAN 70.3 (2008), and MrsK finishing 9842nd in Vätternrundan (2010).

However, in 2011 team KEDQ purchased carbon (Guerciotti) frames, and the old bike was left neglected (and without components) in our storage room.

One year later, I got the idea to revive that old aluminum frame by:

  • stripping it down completely (the bottom bracket (BB) and crankset were still on),
  • giving it a thorough clean-up,
  • installing a new groupset, and finally
  • installing wider tyres (than the 23mm ones).

Goal of the restoration project was to a) get hands-on experience on how to perform the majority of maintenance tasks on a road bike, and b) add a fully functional winter/training bike to my collection. 

The project started with the purchase of:

  • a Shimano Tiagra groupset (350€),
  • a bike repair stand (best 100€ ever spent), and
  • a set of tools required in order to remove the BB & crankset, and install the new ones. 

I set up my bike workshop in our 2m^2 large and badly-lit storage room.

Those 2m^2 were shared with suitcases, a christmas tree, MrsK’s stuffed animals (that I won for her at Liseberg and I am trying to get rid of ever since!), plus other miscellaneous junk. 

Some personal notes that I added to the room before starting working, included a portrait of the Cannibal and Van Gogh’s Skull of a skeleton with a burning cigarette.

The project progressed fast initially. With time, I purchased some more tools, such as:

  • a chain whip,
  • a chain tool, 
  • a grease gun (a must have!), 
  • and some more minor necessities.  

At the final stage (cables/bar tape installation and gears adjustment) I asked my friend Matt to give me a hand in order to speed things up.  

The project was completed and the bike was tested last Saturday

Riding an revived bike gives an extremely euphoric and satisfactory feeling. 

The name of the project, Fleur-de-lys, was inspired by the decorative design resembling a stylized lily, found on many lugs of hand-made bike frames

Back in 2007, while still living in Austria, I purchased my first road bike, composing of a no-name aluminum frame and a Shimano 105 groupset

Between 2007 and 2010, that bike lived ‘glorious’ days with me finishing 992nd in St. Pölten IRONMAN 70.3 (2008), and MrsK finishing 9842nd in Vätternrundan (2010).

However, in 2011 team KEDQ purchased carbon (Guerciotti) frames, and the old bike was left neglected (and without components) in our storage room.

One year later, I got the idea to revive that old aluminum frame by:

  • stripping it down completely (the bottom bracket (BB) and crankset were still on),
  • giving it a thorough clean-up,
  • installing a new groupset, and finally
  • installing wider tyres (than the 23mm ones).

Goal of the restoration project was to a) get hands-on experience on how to perform the majority of maintenance tasks on a road bike, and b) add a fully functional winter/training bike to my collection. 

The project started with the purchase of:

  • a Shimano Tiagra groupset (350€),
  • a bike repair stand (best 100€ ever spent), and
  • a set of tools required in order to remove the BB & crankset, and install the new ones. 

I set up my bike workshop in our 2m^2 large and badly-lit storage room.

Those 2m^2 were shared with suitcases, a christmas tree, MrsK’s stuffed animals (that I won for her at Liseberg and I am trying to get rid of ever since!), plus other miscellaneous junk. 

Some personal notes that I added to the room before starting working, included a portrait of the Cannibal and Van Gogh’s Skull of a skeleton with a burning cigarette.

The project progressed fast initially. With time, I purchased some more tools, such as:

  • a chain whip,
  • a chain tool, 
  • a grease gun (a must have!), 
  • and some more minor necessities.  

At the final stage (cables/bar tape installation and gears adjustment) I asked my friend Matt to give me a hand in order to speed things up.  

The project was completed and the bike was tested last Saturday

Riding an revived bike gives an extremely euphoric and satisfactory feeling. 

The name of the project, Fleur-de-lys, was inspired by the decorative design resembling a stylized lily, found on many lugs of hand-made bike frames

World War II and Ζάχος Δόγκανος Lately I have been listening -during my 30min commute- to the audiobook ‘Inferno: The World at War, 1939-1945’, by Max Hastings. 
I think it is an excellent book and I enjoy every minute of it. As Prof. Richard J. Evans puts it:

"Inferno" offers an account of the war that concentrates on the lived experience of the men and women who took part in it.
…As military history in the round, conveying to a 21st-century readership the human experience of this greatest and most savage of human conflicts in history, “Inferno” is superb.

Reading -or in this case, listening to- ‘Inferno’ has further awakened my interest for World War II. I also started watching the six-part french documentary ‘Apocalypse: The Second World War’,  which is composed exclusively of actual footage of the war as filmed by correspondents, soldiers, resistance fighters and private citizens.

Part of ‘Inferno’ refers to the fighting in Burma, and to the Burma railway (between Bangkok, Thailand, and Burma), built by the Empire of Japan during World War II to support its forces.
The most famous portion of the railway was Bridge 277. This bridge was immortalised by Pierre Boulle in his book and the film based on it, ‘The Bridge on the River Kwai’.
In one of the most famous scenes of the movie, prisoners of war march whistling the ‘Colonel Bogey March’, a popular tune written in 1914. 

Many humorous verses have been sung to this tune. The best known, originated in England -at the outset of World War II- and goes by the title ‘Hitler Has Only Got One Ball’. 
Furthermore, the melody has been used numerous times in popular culture. As a matter of fact, one of my loved greek comedy series, ‘Εκείνες κι εγώ' (where the main character is called Ζάχος Δόγκανος) opens with the Colonel Bogey March.

World War II and Ζάχος Δόγκανος

Lately I have been listening -during my 30min commute- to the audiobook ‘Inferno: The World at War, 1939-1945’, by Max Hastings. 

I think it is an excellent book and I enjoy every minute of it. As Prof. Richard J. Evans puts it:

"Inferno" offers an account of the war that concentrates on the lived experience of the men and women who took part in it.

…As military history in the round, conveying to a 21st-century readership the human experience of this greatest and most savage of human conflicts in history, “Inferno” is superb.

Reading -or in this case, listening to- ‘Inferno’ has further awakened my interest for World War II. I also started watching the six-part french documentary ‘Apocalypse: The Second World War’,  which is composed exclusively of actual footage of the war as filmed by correspondents, soldiers, resistance fighters and private citizens.

Part of ‘Inferno’ refers to the fighting in Burma, and to the Burma railway (between Bangkok, Thailand, and Burma), built by the Empire of Japan during World War II to support its forces.

The most famous portion of the railway was Bridge 277. This bridge was immortalised by Pierre Boulle in his book and the film based on it, ‘The Bridge on the River Kwai’.

In one of the most famous scenes of the movie, prisoners of war march whistling the ‘Colonel Bogey March’, a popular tune written in 1914. 

Many humorous verses have been sung to this tune. The best known, originated in England -at the outset of World War II- and goes by the title ‘Hitler Has Only Got One Ball’. 

Furthermore, the melody has been used numerous times in popular culture. As a matter of fact, one of my loved greek comedy series, ‘Εκείνες κι εγώ' (where the main character is called Ζάχος Δόγκανος) opens with the Colonel Bogey March.

World War II and Ζάχος Δόγκανος Lately I have been listening -during my 30min commute- to the audiobook ‘Inferno: The World at War, 1939-1945’, by Max Hastings. 
I think it is an excellent book and I enjoy every minute of it. As Prof. Richard J. Evans puts it:

"Inferno" offers an account of the war that concentrates on the lived experience of the men and women who took part in it.
…As military history in the round, conveying to a 21st-century readership the human experience of this greatest and most savage of human conflicts in history, “Inferno” is superb.

Reading -or in this case, listening to- ‘Inferno’ has further awakened my interest for World War II. I also started watching the six-part french documentary ‘Apocalypse: The Second World War’,  which is composed exclusively of actual footage of the war as filmed by correspondents, soldiers, resistance fighters and private citizens.

Part of ‘Inferno’ refers to the fighting in Burma, and to the Burma railway (between Bangkok, Thailand, and Burma), built by the Empire of Japan during World War II to support its forces.
The most famous portion of the railway was Bridge 277. This bridge was immortalised by Pierre Boulle in his book and the film based on it, ‘The Bridge on the River Kwai’.
In one of the most famous scenes of the movie, prisoners of war march whistling the ‘Colonel Bogey March’, a popular tune written in 1914. 

Many humorous verses have been sung to this tune. The best known, originated in England -at the outset of World War II- and goes by the title ‘Hitler Has Only Got One Ball’. 
Furthermore, the melody has been used numerous times in popular culture. As a matter of fact, one of my loved greek comedy series, ‘Εκείνες κι εγώ' (where the main character is called Ζάχος Δόγκανος) opens with the Colonel Bogey March.

World War II and Ζάχος Δόγκανος

Lately I have been listening -during my 30min commute- to the audiobook ‘Inferno: The World at War, 1939-1945’, by Max Hastings. 

I think it is an excellent book and I enjoy every minute of it. As Prof. Richard J. Evans puts it:

"Inferno" offers an account of the war that concentrates on the lived experience of the men and women who took part in it.

…As military history in the round, conveying to a 21st-century readership the human experience of this greatest and most savage of human conflicts in history, “Inferno” is superb.

Reading -or in this case, listening to- ‘Inferno’ has further awakened my interest for World War II. I also started watching the six-part french documentary ‘Apocalypse: The Second World War’,  which is composed exclusively of actual footage of the war as filmed by correspondents, soldiers, resistance fighters and private citizens.

Part of ‘Inferno’ refers to the fighting in Burma, and to the Burma railway (between Bangkok, Thailand, and Burma), built by the Empire of Japan during World War II to support its forces.

The most famous portion of the railway was Bridge 277. This bridge was immortalised by Pierre Boulle in his book and the film based on it, ‘The Bridge on the River Kwai’.

In one of the most famous scenes of the movie, prisoners of war march whistling the ‘Colonel Bogey March’, a popular tune written in 1914. 

Many humorous verses have been sung to this tune. The best known, originated in England -at the outset of World War II- and goes by the title ‘Hitler Has Only Got One Ball’. 

Furthermore, the melody has been used numerous times in popular culture. As a matter of fact, one of my loved greek comedy series, ‘Εκείνες κι εγώ' (where the main character is called Ζάχος Δόγκανος) opens with the Colonel Bogey March.

On my first visit to Göteborgs Konstmuseum I had the chance to see the paintings of the mexican artitsts Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

However, the piece that made the greatest impression on me was the sculpture ‘Eggshell Mind' by Thomas Broomé

At first glance, the sculpture depicts a young innocent boy sitting at a desk. With a forthright gaze, he is ready to face the world and the possibilities for knowledge that are open to him. He is as white as the paper in front of him, and his story is as unwritten as the empty paper.

However, a closer look at the sculpture depicts how deceptive the image. The back side of the boy’s head appears to have been cracked by a heavy blow. 

The artist works with a variety of expressions and techniques, often with an undertone of social criticism and a questioning of norms’.

On my first visit to Göteborgs Konstmuseum I had the chance to see the paintings of the mexican artitsts Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

However, the piece that made the greatest impression on me was the sculpture ‘Eggshell Mind' by Thomas Broomé

At first glance, the sculpture depicts a young innocent boy sitting at a desk. With a forthright gaze, he is ready to face the world and the possibilities for knowledge that are open to him. He is as white as the paper in front of him, and his story is as unwritten as the empty paper.

However, a closer look at the sculpture depicts how deceptive the image. The back side of the boy’s head appears to have been cracked by a heavy blow. 

The artist works with a variety of expressions and techniques, often with an undertone of social criticism and a questioning of norms’.